09 September 2011

remembering

This morning I had to walk the boys into school when I took them... because I forgot to turn in Walker's shot record and the voicemail message from the nurse emphatically stated that he would NOT be able to return to school until I took care of it. I swore I had turned it in, but there it was in his vital records file -- whoops!

But that is not the point of this post.

As we walked in, the announcements were going off. Which I thought was unusual because we weren't late. The kiddos off the SAS bus (think: latch key), stopped in their tracks to say the Pledge. The car-rider line teachers had their hands over their hearts as they opened doors for kiddos. The boys and I said the Pledge as we walked in.

After the Pledge there was some Loyd Panther's Song. And by the time I got into the office to hand in papers another voice came over the PA. "Good Morning, students! This Sunday is September 11. Ten years ago on a day like today our country was attacked..."

And I quietly said, "Oh, I might cry." And the secretary said, "Me too."

The voice on the PA went on to explain the awful things that happened that day, in simple yet powerful words for the kids to understand. Then they played "God Bless America."

The secretaries, another parent, and myself retold our stories of where we were that day.

Ten years ago.

I realized that pretty much everyone we know now has had dramatic changes in their lives because of that day. Brad is in the military because of that day. Even friends that were in the military prior to 9-11 had their lives dramatically change afterwards due to increased deployments.

Everyone we know has said good-bye to a soldier going to war. They've missed at least a year of family memories and celebrations. They've hugged tightly and prayed that it would not be the last hug. They've hoped for phone calls, and sent away care packages. They've written letters, and emails, and became good at IM'ing.

Many have sacrificed so much more. They have gotten that knock on their door; the one every military family knows is a possibility but pray we don't hear. One day the knock came and their world changed forever. Most of those knocks come quietly without media coverage and front page stories. But the sacrifice is the same, immeasurable.

And even this morning as we remembered where we were that morning, my eyes welled with tears. I drove home from drop-off past the basic training area where young men & women are becoming soldiers. Our all-volunteer military continues to grow. Families continue to say good-bye and pray fervently for their loved ones. Sacrifices continue. Ten years later, we have not forgotten.

1 comment:

  1. Well written, my friend. That day changed the lives of everyone in America.... at home and abroad. It was the first time many of us spoke the word "war" in the present tense. It is a day that will not be forgotten.....ever.

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