18 February 2014

overflow

Years ago, my sister made a ridiculously huge + fabulous Martha Stewart cheesecake for a family event.  I knew I'd love it and found a happy coincidence that Brad loved it too.  Since then my sister has made it for Brad a few times.  Once she even made it at our house in Oklahoma right before he deployed.  I remember buying the ingredients at the commissary that time and finding out that this is a pretty-pricey dessert.  Thankfully, my sister and  my step-mom kindly continued to make The Cheesecake for Brad on special occasions so I never did.

Until this year.

I decided that Valentine's Day this year was the perfect time to give it a try.  I told my sister via FB that I was going to try it.  I also called her at least twice for advice.  I unwrapped all SEVEN blocks of cream cheese and measured out a cup of sour cream and set out FIVE eggs so they could all come to room temperature.  I posted a giddy little picture on instagram of all my ingredients un-chilling on the counter.  

I talked to my sister on Valentine's morning for moral support.  She was also making The Cheesecake for her husband.  We compared recipe notes; she was using an online version and I still had a splattered copy in my binder from the pre-pinterest days.  We talked through the steps and I prepared my crust while I heard her kitchen-aid whipping up her cream cheese.  She had to hustle out to my nephew's Valentine's Day party so I was left to finish the steps on my own.

I poured the creamy deliciousness into my spring form pan all the way up to the brim.  I delighted the kiddos with plentiful samples of leftover batter.  {I know, FIVE eggs. They're fine.}

As The Cheesecake began to bake, I noticed it was rising right out of the pan.  I texted my step-mom to see if this was normal and she assured me it was.  Crisis averted.

Until about 10 minutes later... when I posted this photo.


I texted my step-mom again and she said, "mine does that too.  I started not using all the batter."  I texted her this lovely picture and she replied, "that's how my first couple turned out.  it will taste good."

Meanwhile, my sister confessed via FB message that she almost called me to tell me not to fill my pan up all the way...but she was running late to a very important Valentine party.  

I was reassured repeatedly that it would still taste fine.  

{and it did}

I thought it was funny that both my sister and my step-mom have made this cheesecake so many times, yet both forgot to tell me the part about all the excess batter and the overflow.

It reminded me of how often we make a mess and forget later that we did.  

Thankfully, my sister and my step-mom, reassured me in my mess. 

Sometimes when we find ourselves in a mess, the best news of all is knowing we aren't alone.  One of the most generous things we can do for each other is share our messes.  Almost every mess has a lesson.  Sharing those lessons we've learned can help someone else avoid a mess.  Or if the mess is unavoidable at least we can say, "I've been there too."

"Live creatively, friends. If someone falls into sin, forgivingly restore him, saving your critical comments for yourself. You might be needing forgiveness before the day’s out. Stoop down and reach out to those who are oppressed. Share their burdens, and so complete Christ’s law. If you think you are too good for that, you are badly deceived." Galatians 6:1-3

I'm guessing the second time I make The Cheesecake the mess will be avoided.  But I hope it will always be a reminder for me about the messes I have forgotten.

No comments:

Post a Comment